Thursday, September 4, 2008

Which early School of Psychology do you like?

While the text reading on the early schools are limited in this chapter, there is enough to give you a general idea of what their main approach is to human behavior. Tell me which one makes the most sense to you and would likely be the most "modern."

18 comments:

Mike D'Amore said...

From what I've read in the textbook, as well as some prior knowledge and private research, I feel that Psychoanalysis seems to be the most "accurate" (as accurate as one can be with something as unpredictable as the human mind)the subconsious drives to do certain things are rather (for lack of a better word) obvious, when you know a lot about your subject of observation's past. However, the Functionalistic idea that "consiousness is an ongoing stream of mental activity" (page 6 paragraph 3) seems to make sense to me, so maybe the best school of Psychology is perhaps a fusions of Psychoanalysis and Functionalism.

-Mike D'Amore

P.S. I was thinkgin about your question "Is Psychology intuitive?" and after some serious thought, I feel that the very basics of Psychology (manipulation and the predicion of people's reaction to something, baseball bat vs $100) but the ability to dive into your own or someone else's psyche and/or to psychoanalyze someone requires expansive knowledge and experience, in other words, education in the field of Psychology

lovejonas91 said...

Hmmmm...
When I read this prompt I was sort of confused. I think this is my answer: The schools during this time period seemed to be structuralized and functionalized. Structuralism talked about breaking things down to better understand what they are all about. Functionalism talked about how different peoples' behaviors are what cause people to act the way they do. The most modern to me seems to be psychoanalysis; I have to agree with Mike D. about it being "accurate". It deals with behaviors and personalities.
I'm not really sure if I answered the question correctly. I am still kind of confused about what it is asking.
~Natalie D., period 1

McCall Theriault said...

As for the question that is being asked, I first have to go back and think as to what chapter one was about. Topics that were discussed in the overview part said that, " there was a range from the behavior of a single brain cell to the behavior and metal process to severely maladaptive behavior and mental process."

As for this I was confused as to how to process this and start to read and comprehend. However, I think that in order to chose between schools of Psychology, you have to first be aware of the influences. (consciousness, perception and motivation)

The "school" (still not being 100%clear) or topic that I agree with is the Nature vs. Nurture. I think that the subject of nature vs. nurture can be separate and also linked together.

Which would I do? Well I would probably combined them, there will always going to be the impact of environment and individualism. Where you grow up and what kind of person you are just doesn't depend on one event or one specific personal influence.

I also believe that Heredity has a huge play into who and what we as individuals are and what we pass on!

I, like Natalie am not sure if i have answered the question right, I to am confused about the "schools". Is it the overall heading of the thoughts or the actual people and where they developed these thoughts??

MLRoxYourSox said...

I liked the psychoanalysis the best because i found it the most interesting. I wanted to know more about what Freud was saying about unconscious conflicts and how psychological disorders could occur from those conflicts. I find that fascinating. I am also curious about how impulses are shown through dreams, slips of the tongue and spontaneous humor. I am eager to learn more about this in later chapters.

~Michaela L. p.1~

Katherine said...

I would have to agree with the others that have already posted a comment on this subject, for basically the same reasons. I like psychoanalysis the most because, well, it just seems to work the best. I don't exactly know what else to say considering I really don't have a favorite "School of Psychology." Yet accuracy is important to me and if I'm going to be trying to understand a human mind, something that is too complex to comprehend at times, I want to work with the best.

laurynp said...

I think that Cornell University was a really good school for this subject back in the 1800's and still today. Cornell is an Ivy League school and many people long for an education from the 8 schools in this league. Another reason I like this school is because it granted the first american women a Ph.D. in psychology. Cornell gives equal chances and psychology was a big subject there.

Matt L said...

After reading the text, I personally like the idea of psychoanalysis the most. It seems like it is the most effective and useful tool to gain knowledge from. I cannot say which school of psycology is the best because we are not giving enough information in the reading to construct a valid opinion as to which is the greatest. If i had to choose on I would have to agree with Lauren and say Corbell, although i am not positive it is the best choice.

amaralsoccer2 said...

As a read in the text book i would have to say I liked the psychoanalysis the best. Freud's theory of personality and behave is very interesting to me i would like to learn more upon why: people say what they say and why dreams occur, memory blocks, slips of the tongue, and spontaneous humer.

Ben Pickering said...

After thorough reading from the text i feel that psychoanalysis is the best. This is because it seems to be the most accurate and accepted to me. Accuracy is very important in determining something and everyone alwyas wants the most accurate readings for anything, whether it deals with psychology or not. I aslo feel Frueds ideas were the most intriguing and felt that he was onto something. In some ways me and Frued share similar opinions and this is probly why psychoanalysis struck me to be the best choice

Ben Pickering Period 1

Chris said...

After reading the text, I too was kind of confused and I'm also not sure, if I'm answering this question right, but I think that Psychoanalysis is the most "modern" way of learning Psychology. I feel this way because it talks about how situations, such as conflicts affects the human mind, behavior and personality.

- Chris E. (Period 1)

gary31 said...

I like behaviorism because it gives reasons for everything you do and it said your behavior comes from what you learn from your surroundings and I agree with that

gary

mishy91 said...

This is Michelle as you now know...

I agree with everyone who said they prefer psychoanalysis because i think that's one of the main reasons why people go into psychology anyway.They want to know why one person can do one thing, while another person takes a completely different route. We basically want to know what makes us tick.
That's my two cents, even if it is late.....

Wynne said...

When I picture psychology I picture some depressed nut-case lying down on a couch while an older gentleman sits beside him asking obscure questions; twiddling in his seat occasionally as he writes on a note pad. It would be safe to say that this idea originated from Freud, moving into various TV shows and films, and finally making its way into the boundless areas of my subconscious memory and brain. This indulgence into the subconscious further takes ideas from those that Freud created. So, this idea or stereotypical image would – in my opinion – be the most relevant to today’s society and most interesting because it triggers something in the back of my head.

Ted Wynne

Leslie said...

The early schools of psychology that interested me were behaviorism and psychoanalysis. One focused on the individual's unconscious behavir, whereas the other focused on the overt behavior. In a way they were th eoppsite of each other. They both looked at the behaviors of people in a totally different prespective. In psychoanalysis, they believed that a person behavior was motivated by unconsicous conflicts surrounding them, which means (well, to me) that a person doesn't really know what he or she is picking up. In behaviorism, you are aware of your surroundings. I don't know, but I like them both.

Taozoo4u said...

Psychoanalysis seems to be the most modern an accurate form of psychology. It deals with behaviors and the subconscious rather dealing with personality.

yipf said...

Marissa Mardo

After reading, I decided that the school of Psychology that I like best is psychoanalysis. Psychoanalysis allows you to learn about people's behavior and personality, and why people dream about certain things. I am also curious as to why Freud believed that psychological disorders could result when unconscious conflicts become extreme. I also found structuralism interesting because it deals with breaking sown our experiences based on sensation and feelings. I am looking forward to learning more about all the Schools of Psychology.

Roberto said...

I believe that Psychoanalysis would have to be the most accurate form of Psychology due to it dealing with analyzing something we can't control, our subconscious. However, even though I think it's the most accurate I wouldn't say that it's my favorite way of dealing with how our mind processes things and how we ourselves act. Which is why I like the idea of Humanistic Psychology better. It brings into account free will, which I am a huge advocate of.

dirkdiggler said...

im going to have to agree with mike and almost everyone else that Psychoanalysis is one of the most interesting fields of psych study